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Pea Protein’s Health Benefits Are Its Best Kept Secret

peaProtein
Pea protein is rapidly becoming a preference among gym-goers and those who consider themselves to be health conscious. This gluten and dairy free food found in our Hop Step Jump Energy Bars has a tremendous number of health benefits for weight loss, building muscle, and it can even help to fight heart disease.

Even if you aren’t a meat eater and lead a vegetarian lifestyle, pea protein can help you meet your protein needs. Research has shown that the protein quality of a single pea product packs nearly the same amount of benefits as eggs and soy. It is hypoallergenic and there is very little risk of bloating which is a common protein powder side effect.

Besides its benefits in building muscle and losing weight, pea protein can lower ghrelin. Ghrelin is a hunger hormone secreted by the stomach that sends a message to your brain informing you it’s empty and you need to eat something. Pea protein produces peptides that delay this secretion, helping you feel fuller for a longer time.

There is a misconception that vegetable-based proteins do not provide the same effects when it comes to muscle growth and recovery post workout as that of a dairy-based protein. A 2015 study published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition shows that’s not the case. Pea protein has a large number of l-arginine, an amino acid that helps to build muscle just as potently as dairy.

This update is brought to you by Hop Step Jump health energy bars. Our non-GMO all natural energy bars are gluten-free and use the finest ingredients including bee pollen, chia seeds, whey protein, maca powder and more. For more information call 954-818-9641 or visit us at www.hopstepjumpenergybars.com.

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Beet Powder Packs a Serious Jolt

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The fifth and final superfood found in our Hop Step Jump Energy Bars that we’ll be taking a look at is beet powder. This slightly sweet yet earthy ingredient packs a jolt of nutrients and is loaded with the same vitamins and minerals found in the red beets that the powder is derived from. Antioxidants, potassium, iron, dietary fiber, all of this and plenty more like nitrate that helps to improve blood flow come packed in beet powder.

Two major health benefits of beet powder are its abilities to lower blood pressure thanks to the nitrates and boosting blood flow to the brain. Much like cardamom, it’s also capable of preventing specific types of cancer. Improved liver health, cholesterol reduction, beet powder even functions as an aphrodisiac.

However, for purposes of our energy bars, it’s the health benefits regarding energy that make beet powder. With beet powder, you’ll notice increased stamina during those tough workouts, allowing you to do those extra reps that build muscle and improve your overall endurance. Because of the nitrate in beet powder and its ability to regulate oxygen uptake, exercise becomes less exhausting, allowing you to work out for a greater amount of time. What’s more, beets provide these benefits without any of the negative side effects of many other carbohydrate-heavy foods.

This update is brought to you by Hop Step Jump health energy bars. Our non-GMO all natural energy bars are gluten-free and use the finest ingredients including bee pollen, chia seeds, whey protein, maca powder and more. For more information call 954-818-9641 or visit us at www.hopstepjumpenergybars.com.

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Cardamom Is More Than Just a Spice

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Found in the lush forests of India, cardamom was once highly valued for its medicinal benefits in the East Indies. Today it’s usually added as a spice to give food some flavor but it’s also one of the five superfoods found in our Hop Step Jump Energy Bars, packed with plenty of health benefits. A two tablespoon serving of cardamom has a mere 36 calories but adds a tremendous amount of flavor. This is a huge plus if you’re keeping count of calories but would rather avoid the often bland taste of “diet” foods.

Cardamom is also rich in fiber which assists in weight control as it will leave you feeling fuller after a meal. That same two tablespoon serving of ground cardamom includes just over three grams of dietary fiber.

Your tissues need fuel to ensure optimum daily function and with the manganese present inside of cardamom, the mineral will not only help tissue function, it will also play a role in boosting bone health. Cardamom also has iron which will provide your tissues with much needed oxygen.

Cardamom has many other positive health benefits like lowering blood pressure, functioning as an antioxidant, detoxifying the body, assisting with digestion, and has been shown to potentially fight off certain cancer cells.

This update is brought to you by Hop Step Jump health energy bars. Our non-GMO all natural energy bars are gluten-free and use the finest ingredients including bee pollen, chia seeds, whey protein, maca powder and more. For more information call 954-818-9641 or visit us at www.hopstepjumpenergybars.com.

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The Huge Nutritional Punch of Chia Seeds

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Last time we discussed bee pollen, one of the five superfoods packed into our Hop Step Jump Health Energy Bars. Today we’re taking a look at another superfood that packs a huge nutritious punch: chia seeds. These black seeds are tiny but deliver a massive amount of nutrients while keeping calories very low. In fact, the word “chia” is derived from the ancient Mayan word meaning “strength”.

A single ounce of chia seeds includes over eleven grams of fiber, four grams of protein, calcium, magnesium, and even a decent amount of zinc, healthy fatty acids, potassium and several vitamins. What’s more, this small ounce has less than 140 calories and is very low on carbohydrates. Chia seeds are also considered whole grain foods, they are non-GMO, gluten free and are typically grown organically.

In addition to being loaded with antioxidants, nearly all of the carbohydrates in chia seeds are carbohydrates. An ounce of seeds contains about twelve grams, but eleven of those are fiber, which the body does not digest. Fiber will not raise blood sugar and should not be deemed a carb, which essentially means an ounce of chia seeds only has a mere gram per ounce. With the high fiber and protein, chia seeds can be incredibly helpful with weight loss.

This update is brought to you by Hop Step Jump health energy bars. Our non-GMO all natural energy bars are gluten-free and use the finest ingredients including bee pollen, chia seeds, whey protein, maca powder and more. For more information call 954-818-9641 or visit us at www.hopstepjumpenergybars.com.

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All About Bee Pollen

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One of the five superfood ingredients in our Hop Step Jump energy bars is bee pollen, but what’s that all about and how does it help you with your exercise or weight loss plan?

About forty percent of bee pollen is comprised of protein and it is, in fact, one of the most naturally nourishing foods available. It’s packed with just about all of the nutrients human beings require and about half of the protein is made up of free amino acids that can be used by the body. Bee pollen is also rich in vitamins, minerals, and can boost the immune system.

Among the many benefits of bee pollen is its function as an antioxidant and its benefits as a dietary supplement. While these are certainly important, it’s the weight loss benefits that make bee pollen stand out. Studies have proven that bee pollen can greatly assist with recovering muscle protein and metabolizing energy.

If you’re looking to stay away from heavily processed foods, bee pollen is one of the most effective ways to naturally boost your nutrient intake. Along with the other superfoods like Maca Powder, Chia Seeds, Beet Powder, and Cardamom, our bars pack a highly nutritious and very healthy punch that provide optimum performance.

This update is brought to you by Hop Step Jump health energy bars. Our non-GMO all natural energy bars are gluten-free and use the finest ingredients including bee pollen, chia seeds, whey protein, maca powder and more. For more information call 954-818-9641 or visit us at www.hopstepjumpenergybars.com.

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What to Look for in a Snack Bar

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In a perfect world, everyone would eat vegetables, fruit, and the recommended serving of lean protein but alas, that is not reality. When you’re busy dealing with life’s everyday responsibilities, sometimes the best compromise is to munch on a snack bar. With the mind boggling amount to choose from, how do you know which is best?

When looking for a snack bar, you want to focus less on the snazzy packaging and superfluous nutritional phrases and instead, look at the essential nutritional facts. One of the first things you want to look at is the size of the bar which typically ranges between twenty to more than seventy grams. A larger bar may fill you up some more, but it may also contain an excessive amount of calories and fats. Smaller bars may not leave you feeling full and you may find that you’ll need to eat a few to feel satisfied. A mid-size bar with forty to fifty grams may be the best option.

If weight loss is your priority, evaluating calories is absolutely essential. Many health bars overdo it when it comes to the number of necessary calories as the most popular ones are aimed at athletes or bodybuilders that need quick bursts of energy. It may be best to stick to bars that have less than 200 calories.

Our Hop Step Jump Energy Bars contain less than 150 calories and are only forty grams, packed with five superfoods designed to supply, sustain, and refuel.

This update is brought to you by Hop Step Jump health energy bars. Our non-GMO all natural energy bars are gluten-free and use the finest ingredients including bee pollen, chia seeds, whey protein, maca powder and more. For more information call 954-818-9641 or visit us at www.hopstepjumpenergybars.com.

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What Are Net Carbs All About?

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Carbohydrates or “carbs” are the food macronutrients your body converts to glucose in order to fuel itself. Should you consume more of these than the amount of fuel your body needs, these carbs will become glycogen in the muscles and liver while the rest of it will be converted into fat.

Individuals that are following a strict diet involving low carb will count the grams of carbohydrate versus the calories and their primary focus remains the net carbs. Net carbs are the ones that directly impact insulin levels and blood sugar levels.

To put it simply, net carbs are the grams of total carbohydrates in a portion of food minus the amount of grams of fiber. Because fiber is undigestible, it does not affect blood sugar levels or cause an insulin response. Those following a low carb diet therefore do not count fiber as a carbohydrate.

To calculate net carbs, begin by subtracting all of the insoluble fiber (if listed) from the total carbs and total fiber. If there are more than five grams of total fiber, you may also subtract half of the remaining fiber from total carbs. Take a look at the sugar alcohols. If there are over five grams of sugar alcohols, subtract half that amount from the total carbohydrates. Our energy bars contain 7/8 net carbs and no alcohol sugars that would also factor in the calculation.

If you’d like to learn more about how our energy bars can help you with your low carb diet, we’ll be hosting a Hop Step Jump demonstration at the Flamingo South Beach on Wednesday July 20th.

This update is brought to you by Hop Step Jump health energy bars. Our non-GMO all natural energy bars are gluten-free and use the finest ingredients including bee pollen, chia seeds, whey protein, maca powder and more. For more information call 954-818-9641 or visit us at www.hopstepjumpenergybars.com.

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Understanding “Good” and “Bad” Sugar

sugarChances are you’ve heard that there’s such a thing as good and bad carbs or good fats and bad fats. The same idea applies to sugar. There is the “good” sugar that’s typically found in foods such as vegetables and fruits, bundled with other healthy ingredients like antioxidants, fiber, and vitamins. A cup of cherries has about seventeen grams of sugar but it’s packed with healthy extras, falling just below the World Health Organization’s recommendation that we eat no more than 25 grams per day for optimal health. The USDA suggests no more than 50 grams.

And there is the “bad” sugar which covers just about anything that hasn’t been added by Mother Nature. Candy, baked goods, soda, all of these have “bad” sugar. The best way to boost your long-term health, reduce the risk of heart disease and maintain a healthy weight is to either avoid or cut back on processed foods and sweets that contain “bad” sugar. Always make sure to read the labels, but do be aware that these labels will not distinguish between “good” and “bad” sugar.

Our Hop Step Jump Energy Bars are packed with Bee Pollen and 5 super foods. The Bars are sweetened with honey and coconut sugar which are “good” sugar sources providing more vitamins and minerals than typical white table sugar while also maintaining a low glycemic impact.

This update is brought to you by Hop Step Jump health energy bars. Our non-GMO all natural energy bars are gluten-free and use the finest ingredients including bee pollen, chia seeds, whey protein, maca powder and more. For more information call 954-818-9641 or visit us at www.hopstepjumpenergybars.com.

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Understanding Non-GMO

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You’ve probably heard the words “non-GMO’ being used a lot, but few people understand what it means. Non-GMO means that the food you’re consuming has not been genetically modified. GMOs or genetically modified organisms are made in laboratories using techniques involving engineering and modification. The organisms can pose risks to your health and the environment, leading more people to demand that foods be “non-GMO”. Increased use of pesticides, organ damage, and fertility issues are just a few examples of the negative effects of GMO foods.

In genetic modification or engineering of plants that provide food, scientists remove genes from the DNA of another organism, such as a bacterium, virus, animal, or plant and “recombine” them into another plant, altering their DNA. Genetic engineers hope that by implanting the plant with these new genes, the traits associated with the genes will be carried out. Unfortunately, the implanting of these genes is random and there is no way to determine how it may affect other genes, which could lead to the production of food allergens and toxins.

If you want to avoid the risk of consuming foods with GMO, especially if you’re looking for a food that can help you with your workout and building muscle, it may be wise to stay away from processed foods that contain ingredients coming from soybeans, canola, corn, or sugar beets. When you’re out shopping, make sure that the food is labeled non-GMO or consider sticking to organic foods. Organic food production strictly prohibits genetically modified substances.

This update is brought to you by Hop Step Jump health energy bars. Our non-GMO all natural energy bars are gluten-free and use the finest ingredients including bee pollen, chia seeds, whey protein, maca powder and more. For more information call 954-818-9641 or visit us at www.hopstepjumpenergybars.com.

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Bees are coming Back

 

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Study published in Biology Letters finds Argentine ants may be contributing to decline in honeybee population; biologist Alexandra Sebastien of Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, who leads research, says ants can carry deformed wing virus, which is linked to bee colony collapse. MORE
SEP. 11, 2015
United States Court of Appeals in San Francisco rules Environmental Protection Agency was wrong in permitting Dow AgroSciences insecticide, which was toxic to honeybees, onto market; cancels its approval. MORE
AUG. 10, 2015
Three-acre green space atop Brooklyn’s Barclays Center, planted with thousands of sedum plants, briefly becomes foraging destination for hundreds, possibly thousands, of bees; experts have no explanation for the sudden appearance and equally rapid disappearance of the pollinators, but say they would be unlikely to have moved across East River to Manhattan. MORE
JUL. 28, 2015
Study published in The Journal of Environmental Chemistry reports finding insecticides containing neonicotinoids, which have been linked to colony collapse disorder, in more than 70 percent of pollen and honey samples collected from hives in Massachusetts. MORE
JUL. 10, 2015
Study in journal Science proposes warming temperatures as reason bees are shrinking away from southern limits of their North American and European ranges; research tracked bumblebee travels and observed range shrinkage from southern border by as much as 190 miles since 1970s; results may explain declining bumblebee species, but critics say study does not make strong case climate change is main cause. MORE